Ukip: A timeline of the party's turbulent history

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The final candidates hoping to turn the party's fortunes around, and ensure Brexit goes ahead, include MEP Jane Collins, Nuttall's former deputy Peter Whittle, London Assembly Member David Kurten, ex-soldier Henry Bolton, John Rees-Evans and Aidan Powlesland - who (genuinely) wants to mine the asteroid belt for minerals.

Bolton faces a considerable task in heading a party whose share of the vote fell to 1.8% at the last general election from 12.6% in 2015. The party entered a period of chaos following its victory in European Union referendum: Farage resigned and was replaced by Diane James, who herself quit after just 18 days.

This prompted yet another contest for leadership of the party, between seven largely unknown candidates, at a time when membership was already falling.

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After the result of the election released at the party's annual conference, Bolton issued a plea urging the members to rally around the party.

Indeed, Mr Bolton had said that UKIP was in danger of becoming the "UK Nazi Party" if it plumped for Ms Waters (Ms Waters herself has vigorously denied this sort of claim). Bolton reportedly said he was "fine" with the new design.

Waters, who has described Islam as "evil", caused chaos by standing, with senior party figures threatening to leave if she won. He added: "I think the party has today voted for a leader who has been very open about what he feels is the way forward, and that's myself of course". BBC political correspondent Ben Wright said Mr Bolton would be seen as the continuity candidate.

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Why is Ukip on its fourth leader in just over a year?

The party has been riven by splits and disagreements, one of which resulted in MEP Steven Woolfe being taken to hospital after a fight with another Ukip MEP.

Ten days later, Mr Farage quit, saying: "I said I wanted my country back, now I want my life back", insisting that - unlike his reversed resignation a year earlier - he was going for good.

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But he resigned just eight months later after a disastrous General Election.

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