What Do New Documents Reveal About Prince's Prescription?

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ET obtained court documents on Monday in the death investigation of the singer, and the results of the search warrant shows that bottles of opioid painkillers were found throughout Prince's Paisley Park compound in Chanhassen, Minnesota. He had also shown up to Paisley Park on April 21 - the day Prince was found dead in an elevator of an accidental overdose of fentanyl - to drop off some test results for the singer.

Schulenberg is the same doctor who was at Paisley Park on April 21 (the day of Prince's death) when deputies arrived on scene and the same doctor who admitted to authorities, he prescribed Oxycodone for Prince on April 14, the day before he overdosed while returning from a show in Atlanta, forcing his plane into an emergency landing. The goal was for the younger Kornfeld to help evaluate Prince's health and encourage him to enter treatment for pain management and potential addiction issues, attorney William Mauzy told reporters.

The search also included going through phone records of Prince's associates as well as emails in order to find out where he received the drug fentanyl.

- A Minnesota doctor is disputing that he ever prescribed opioids to Prince, following the unsealing of search warrants in the death investigation that say otherwise.

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According to an affidavit filed September 12, 2016, Carver County Sheriff's investigators and the DEA conducted a Minnesota Prescription Monitoring Program warrant. Oxycodone was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. As for his secret alias, the papers said, "Judith confirmed that Prince would use the name "Peter Bravestrong" when he would travel..."

Other bottles of pills were marked under the name of his friend Kirk Johnson. Johnson was Prince's bodyguard. The newly unsealed documents give the clearest picture yet of Prince's struggle with opioid painkillers.

Schulenberg's lawyer, Amy Conners, disputed that.

Patients who take prescription opioids eventually build up a tolerance and need to take stronger doses to get the same effect. And news that he died of an overdose of fentanyl - a synthetic drug 50 times more powerful than heroin - surprised and saddened those who knew him as someone with a reputation for clean living.

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One pill bottle, which was labeled Vitamin D, instead contained a different medication inside, according to the search warrant filed by authorities. But Johnson hasn't talked to federal prosecutors, according to the official with knowledge of the investigation, who spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. Complaints typically take 90 to 120 days to resolve, she said.

Investigators have said little publicly about the case over the previous year, other than it is active. He and five others were searching for Prince when Kornfeld said he heard a scream.

James L. Jones, a spokesman for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's field office in Chicago, said anyone convicted of writing a prescription for someone under another person's name could lose their DEA registration - meaning they could no longer prescribe medications - and could face discipline from their state medical board.

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